Welcome Reception

Our welcome reception will be the perfect way to kick start your conferencing experience.

Share some drinks and good company while indulging in a delicious canape selection. 

You will also enjoy music provided by USQ student, Ayden Roberts. Ayden is a muso on the road around SEQ. His music, described as quirky, catchy and a little bit out there, takes his naive belief that his guitar can be anything it wants resulting in live shows that are a lot of fun. A zingy journey into falling in love and rolling around in it.

All the info

Location: Exhibition (Refectory)
When: Monday 4 December, 4.30pm – 5.30pm


Get to know the ASCILITE SIGs (Special Interest Groups)

ASCILITE session

Hazel Jones
University of Southern Queensland
@hazelj59

Colin Simpson
ANU
@gamerlearner

Mathew Hillier
Monash University
Personal: @mathewhillier Transforming Assessment (e-Assessment) SIG: @transformassess

Thomas Cochrane
Auckland University of Technology
@thomcochrane

Cassandra Colvin
Charles Sturt University
@casssays

Linda Corrin
University of Melbourne
@lindacorrin

Sakinah Alhadad
Griffith University

Julie Willems
RMIT University
@Julie_Willems

Leanne Cameron
Southern Cross University
@leannecameron

Catch this session

Monday 4 December, 2.30pm - 3pm
H102

Abstract

ASCILITE supports a range of Special Interest Groups (SIGS) to provide “ASCILITE members the opportunity to work together to pursue common interests in research and practice and to create a 'buzz' around their focus, goals and achievements both within and beyond the ASCILITE community.” (ASCILITE, 2014). The purpose of this lighting round session will be to introduce each of the ASCILITE SIGS to delegates. SIG leaders will provide a brief overview of the purpose and focus of their respective SIGS, as well as a summary of the activities undertaken during 2017. They will also outline what their SIG considers the top 2-3 online learning/education issues/questions are for the immediate future. Following the overview presentations and a brief Q&A discussion session, attendees will have the opportunity to network in a Meet and Greet format.

About the authors

Hazel Jones

Hazel Jones is currently an Educational Designer and a PhD candidate at University of Southern Queensland Australia. Her research interests are in higher education and learning analytics, with an emphasis on support for online learning and teaching and for working with academics to provide quality learning environments for their students. She has worked in educational design and development roles at universities around Australia for over 15 years. She is currently one of the co-ordinators for the ASCILITE Learning Analytics SIG and a mentor for the ASCILITE Community Mentoring program.

Colin Simpson

Colin Simpson has worked as a Learning Technologist, Education Designer and Academic Developer since 2003 and currently works in the College of Business and Economics at ANU. He is a co-convenor of ASCILITE TEL edvisors special interest group
Colin has extensive experience in the design and development of media and interactive resources and a particular interest in game-based learning and gamification, including the use of badges. He has presented at a wide array of national and international conferences on these subjects.

He is a Certified Member of the Association of Learning Technologists (CMALT), a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (FHEA) and an Associate Fellow of the Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia (HERDSA). Colin is currently undertaking PhD research at the University of Sydney into the ways that TEL edvisors can better support TELT practices in Higher Education.

Mathew Hillier

Mathew is one of two co-leaders of the ASCILITE SIG for 'e-Assessment' and in this capacity is a co-host of the Transforming Assessment webinar series along with Prof Geoffrey Crisp.

He specialises in e-assessment and e-exams and teaches into the academic staff development program at Monash University leading the 'technology and space' theme. Mathew is currently the leader of the 'Transforming Exams' project developing a tool set for authentic, computerised, high-stakes assessment (e-Exams). The project covers 10 university partners and is funded by a half-million dollar Australian government grant.

More about Mathew at http://ta.vu/mathewhillier

Thomas Cochrane

Thomas Cochrane has established an international reputation for excellence in the scholarship of technology enhanced learning (SOTEL), with an expertise in mobile learning. Thomas has a peer-reviewed research portfolio spanning 46 journal articles, 26 book chapters, and over 120 conference proceedings (http://goo.gl/maps/YxkYP). Thomas was co-lead on the national project Learners and mobile devices (#NPF14LMD): A framework for enhanced learning and institutional change funded by New Zealand's National Centre for Tertiary Teaching Excellence, AKO Aotearoa. This two-year six institution project broadly explored learners and mobile devices (Frielick et al., 2014), supported by a collaborative network of practice. Thomas has also developed a successful framework for lecturer professional development supported by the establishment of communities of practice, production of reflective practice publications via SOTEL, and innovations in pedagogy (Cochrane et al., 2013; Cochrane & Narayan, 2016). These communities of practice have collectively published over 50 collaborative research publications since 2011 (http://orcid.org/0000-0002-0192-6118).

Cassandra Colvin

Cassandra is currently Manager, Adaptive Learning and Teaching Services at Charles Sturt University. Prior to this appointment she was Manager, Learning Analytics, and Manager, Enhancing Student Academic Potential, an academic intervention program targeting first-year students who had been identified as academically vulnerable, both appointments at University of South Australia. Cassandra has enjoyed extensive experience in the international education industry, primarily in management roles supporting the needs of international students. In 2007, Cassandra led the team at Edith Cowan University which an Australian Office of Learning and Teaching program award in the category 'The First-Year Experience'. Cassandra has presented widely on themes relating to learning analytics, student support, and intercultural interactions. Particular interests include learning analytics implementations and practice in higher education, intercultural relations between students, and embedding quality and continuous improvement tenets into all aspects of her work.

Linda Corrin

Dr Linda Corrin is a Senior Lecturer in Higher Education in the Williams Centre for Learning Advancement, Faculty of Business and Economics, at the University of Melbourne. In her current role, she provides support for curriculum development, delivery and assessment to staff in the faculty. Her research interests include students' engagement with technology, learning analytics, feedback, and learning design. Currently, she is working on several large research projects exploring how learning analytics can be used to provide mean

Sakinah Alhadad

Sakinah is a psychological scientist with expertise in behavioural and cognitive science in relation to student learning and well-being, learning analytics, research methods and statistics, and academic development. She is currently the academic lead for learning analytics at the Centre for Learning Futures at Griffith University. Sakinah’s research interests sit at the research-practice nexus, with the broad goal of enhancing the practice of teaching and learning. She is particularly interested in the underlying mechanisms that support the development of expertise and flexible ways of knowing: in particular, educators developing as evidence-informed teachers; and for learners, developing as self- and socially-regulated lifelong learners. As such, her work is guided by meaningful applications and implications for educational practice in complexity. Her ultimate aim is to enable positive change for learners and professionals through transformative Higher Education practices.

Julie Willems

Dr Julie Willems holds qualifications in Nursing, the Humanities, and Education. She has worked across the Australian education sectors and, since 2004, has specialised in Higher Education. Her current position is as a Senior Lecturer in RMIT University’s Learning and Teaching Academy. Julie’s research interests include the promotion of educational and digital equity as social justice issues, and the media and technology of formal and informal learning (including social media). She was a recipient of the auDA Foundation's national 2011 research grant for the i-Survive Project investigating the use of ‘back channel’ communications via mobile technologies and social media during Australian emergencies and disasters. Julie has a community focus and has actively served on a number of committees and boards over the course of her career, and is currently in her second term on the national Executive for Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education (ASCILITE) (2015 – ). Julie has recently been recognised as a leader in open, online and distance learning in the Australia-Pacific region (http://jl4d.org/index.php/ejl4d/article/view/207/201).

Leanne Cameron

Leanne Cameron is currently working at Southern Cross University as Lecturer, Design, Digital & Technologies Education in the School of Education. It was over 10 years ago while working with Macquarie University’s E-Learning Centre of Excellence that her work in the area of Learning Design began. She has managed three OLT research projects researching various aspects of Learning Design and she continues to research and publish in the field. Her most recent publication, ‘How learning designs, teaching methods and activities differ by discipline in Australian universities’ was included in the final volume of the Journal of Learning Design this year.


A framework for the analysis, comparison and evaluation of e-assessment systems

Full paper

Download the paper [PDF]

Pedro Isaias
The University of Queensland

Paula Miranda
University Institute of Lisbon
@pcrmiranda1

Sarah Pifano
Information Society Reserach Lab

Catch this session

Monday 4 December, 11am - 11.30am
Stream 3
L206

Abstract

The use of technology within the education sector affects many aspects of the learning process, including assessment. Electronic assessment presents many advantages over traditional paper based methods and it is being widely used by teachers and educational institutions. The progressive acceptance and use of e-assessment has resulted in the development of a panoply of e-assessment systems. This paper aims to propose a framework for the analysis and comparison of e-assessment systems, to support the selection of the most suitable assessment instruments. The proposed framework is composed of eight criteria: variety of design options, scalability, security, access and usability, feedback features, personalisation, cost and interoperability, which overall were validated by the viewpoints of educational experts via an online questionnaire.

About the authors

Pedro Isaias

Pedro Isaias is an Associate Professor of Higher Education Innovation at the Institute for Teaching and Learning Innovation (ITaLI), The University of Queensland, Australia. He teaches topics in Management Information Systems (MIS). He has a background in MIS, having obtained a Doctorate in Information Management (Information and Decision Systems speciality) in 2002. Previously he was associate professor at the Universidade Aberta (Portuguese Open University) in Lisbon, Portugal.

Author of several books, book chapters, papers and research reports, all in the information systems area, he has headed several conferences and workshops within the mentioned area. He has also been responsible for the scientific coordination of several EU funded research projects. He is also member of the editorial board of several journals and program committee member of several conferences and workshops. At the moment he conducts research activity focusing in Learning Technologies and e-Business.

Paula Miranda</

Paula Miranda holds a Ph.D. in Information Science and Technology from the ISCTE – University Institute of Lisbon. She is Auxiliary Professor in the Department of Informatics and Systems Engineering of the Setubal School of Technology, Polytechnic Institute of Setubal. Her areas of interest include Information Systems in general, Social Media, e-Learning, more specifically the use of Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 technologies in learning environments and the integration of technology in education.

Sarah Pifano

Sara Pífano is a Researcher at the Information Society Research Lab (ISRLab) where she conducts research on the broad field of the Information Society. She holds a PhD in Information Management from the Universidade Aberta (Portuguese Open University). At the ISRLab, she is responsible for conducting and fostering scientific research, including the design, implementation and evaluation of research initiatives addressing the use of Web 2.0 in several domains of the information society, particularly education and business, the application of social media in the context of e-Learning, learning technologies, digital literacy, and online communities.


Critical perspectives on mobile AR and VR from the ASCILITE Mobile Learning SIG

ASCILITE session

Thomas Cochrane
Auckland University of Technology
@thomcochrane

Helen Farley
University of Southern Queensland
@Helssi

Claudio Aguayo
Auckland University of Technology
@caguayoNZ

James Birt
Bond University

Michael Cowling
Central Queensland University
@macowling

Roger Edmonds
University of South Australia
@rogked

Catch this session

Monday 4 December, 3.30pm - 4.30pm
Stream 4
Room L209

Abstract

This symposium discussion is based around the special issue of AJET on mobile Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality that the ASCILITE Mobile Learning SIG has coordinated this year (published September 2017). The authors will use the articles to spark discussion around the critical issues surrounding the educational use of mobile AR and VR.

About the authors

Thomas Cochrane

Dr Thomas Cochrane has established an international reputation for excellence in the scholarship of technology enhanced learning (SOTEL), an AJET associate editor, guest editor of the AJET special issue on mobile AR & VR, and the coordinator of the Ascilite Mobile Learning SIG. Thomas has a peer-reviewed research portfolio spanning 46 journal articles, 26 book chapters, and over 120 conference proceedings (http://goo.gl/maps/YxkYP). Thomas was co-lead on the national project Learners and mobile devices (#NPF14LMD): A framework for enhanced learning and institutional change funded by New Zealand's National Centre for Tertiary Teaching Excellence, AKO Aotearoa. This two-year six institution project broadly explored learners and mobile devices, supported by a collaborative network of practice. Thomas has also developed a successful framework for lecturer professional development supported by the establishment of communities of practice, production of reflective practice publications via SOTEL, and innovations in pedagogy (http://orcid.org/0000-0002-0192-6118).

Helen Farley

Dr Helen Farley is an Associate Professor, Digital Life Lab, University of Southern Queensland.
Helen led the USQ-led Collaborative Research Network (CRN) project with ANU and UniSA to develop a Mobile Learning Evaluation Framework. She is an AJET associate editor, editor of an edited book on mobile learning in the Asia-Pacific region, guest editor of the AJET special issue on mobile AR & VR, and a core member of the ASCILITE Mobile Learning SIG.
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9511-4910

Claudio Aguayo

Dr Claudio Aguayo is the Director – Research & Development, for the App Lab, and Senior Researcher at the Centre for Learning and Teaching, Auckland University of Technology. He completed his PhD at the University of Waikato in 2014, with his thesis entitled ‘The use of education for sustainability websites for community education in Chile’. Claudio is currently undertaking research projects at the local, national and international level in mobile learning, educational App development, use of Virtual Reality in Teaching and Learning contexts, and self-organisation of learning technologies.

James Birt

James is an Assistant Professor of Interactive Media and Design in the Faculty of Society and Design at Bond University, where he runs the Mixed Reality Research Lab (www.mixedrealityresearch.com). His research spans computer science and visual arts, with an emphasis on applied design and development of interactive mixed reality (virtual reality, augmented reality, 3d printing, mobile) experiences assisting learning, skills acquisition and knowledge discovery. The distinctive contribution James brings to education scholarship is in digital media teaching and learning, where he received a 2014 Australian Office of Learning and Teaching citation for outstanding contributions to student learning. James utilises novel pedagogical approaches, curriculum and resources to balance the science and art predilections of his students, whilst supporting them with learning how to learn. His service to the university and wider community has formed around his experience in emerging technology, teaching and learning. Where he takes an active role in supporting learners and peers through mentorship, presentations and expert judging.

Michael Cowling

Dr Michael Cowling is an information technologist with a keen interest in educational technology and technology ubiquity in the digital age, and a Senior Lecturer in the School of Engineering & Technology at CQUniversity Australia. He is currently a partner in an OLT Innovation and Development grant, and is the recipient of an Australian Government Citation for Outstanding Contribution to Student Learning. He founded The CREATE Lab at CQUniversity, focused on collaborative research & engagement around technology and education, and is co-founder of The Mixed Reality Research Lab, in collaboration with Bond University, focusing on mixed reality technology research in education. He is also a regular contributor to media outlet The Conversation and is also a regular contributor in Australian radio and print media on the topics of Educational Technology and Technology Ubiquity.

Roger Edmonds

Roger Edmonds is Online Educational Designer, at the Teaching Innovation Unit, University of South Australia. He is co-leading a Digital Learning Strategy Project on 'location-based mobile learning'. This project aims to implement location-based mobile learning games in three different UniSA courses in order to inform the development of a mobile learning framework that can be later replicated in other educational contexts. The framework will be used to guide the future design and decision making for providing contextually based mobile learning in the university. It will be used by academics to complement and enrich long their standing (non-digital) teaching and learning experiences with new, genuinely effective digital educational interventions delivered in authentic contexts outside of the classroom.

 


Becoming an AJET author or reviewer

ASCILITE session

Michael Henderson
Monash University

Petrea Redmond
University of Southern Queensland

Catch this session

Monday 4 December, 2.30pm - 3pm
Stream 5
Room C204

Abstract

Join the editors of the Australasian Journal of Educational Technology for a session that will provide an overview of the AJET editorial process, including details of both the screening and the peer review processes and criteria. It will also encourage a general discussion of tips and tricks for publishing in the field of educational technology. The session will feature a short presentation from the editors followed by a question and answer session, with plenty of opportunity for discussion.

 

 


Old me, new me, IT: Changing prisoner behaviour through visual stories

Lightning talks 1

Rob Steer
Northern Territory Correctional Services

Catch this session

Monday 4 December, 2.30pm - 3pm
Stream 4
Room L209

Abstract

The Northern Territory prison population has grown over the last 20 years at a rate greater than other jurisdictions and recorded the highest recidivism rate with 58% of prisoners returning to prison within two years.
One of the challenges confronting the NT correctional system is the continued over-representation of Indigenous people in prisons, with Indigenous people comprising 85% of the adult prisoner population.
Indigenous people face a number of challenges reintegrating into the community and these challenges are often exacerbated by low levels of literacy, numeracy and basic skills, with many prisoners not able to understand English.
One of the initiatives introduced by NTCS is the use of visual stories, which can be translated into different languages, including Indigenous languages. Stories on work, health and safety, food hygiene and safe driving have been translated into the five most predominant Central Australian Indigenous languages. One of the most positive stories produced is titled Old Me, New Me, which assists prisoners to recognise how their previous behaviour was unacceptable and works through how they can change for the better.
NTCS has an agreement with local company, iTalk Studios, to faciliate the creation of the stories, including the provision of training to prisoners in spoken English and multi-media activities.
To date, the partnership has seen male and female prisoners produce in excess of 60 work and personal stories.
The stories produced are a new medium of communicating, transforming how we share information. The organisation can turn any written information into a visual story.

About the author

Rob Steer

• Has 25 years’ experience, across four Australian Correctional Jurisdictions.
• In 1990, responsible for establishing the first private sector factory within a Correctional Centre in Australasia.
• In 1996, established Prison Industries at Mt Gambier prison.
• During a seven year period, involved in building, constructing, commissioning and operation of Port Phillip Prison.
• In 2003, responsible for generating work opportunities for 5,500 prisoners for Corrective Services Industries NSW.
• Holds a Diploma of Export (Marketing Major) and has undertaken International Business Development program at Monash University, post       graduate studies in Manufacturing Management and Graduate Diploma in Applied Management.
• Currently President of the Correctional Industries Association of Australasia.
• Awarded with Rotary “Pride of Workmanship” and “Excellence in Commitment to Skills and Education” awards.
Current Title: Director, Custodial Operations, NT Correctional Services

 


Using virtual and augmented reality to study architectural lighting

Concise paper

Download the paper [PDF]

James Birt
Bond University

Patricia Manyuru
Bond University

Jonathan Nelson

Catch this session

Monday 4 December, 2.10pm - 2.30pm
Stream 1
Room H102 Allison Dickson Lecture Theatre

Abstract

This paper presents industry stakeholder insights from the implementation of a dual modality intervention using virtual and augmented reality simulation to study complex lighting theory in architecture design. Using a design based research method the aim is to evaluate these insights and inform a pilot study to educate first year architectural design students on the complexities of lighting the built environment and methods to improve architectural workflow. The aim is to enable learners to experience natural and artificial lighting methods comparatively in real-time through multiple comparative visualisation methods. This is important to make informed evaluations regarding architectural designs in terms of spatial quality, character, performance, and user-comfort levels. This in turn allows architects to rapidly modify their designs to accommodate or mitigate the environmental effects. Outcomes from the initial usability test highlight the ability to switch back and forth between the virtual and augmented reality simulation technology, and between lighting visualisation modes as a huge step forward by the industry stakeholders. Additionally, the idea of representing the physical building where the simulation took place virtually using a detailed mapping gave a real-world anchor that made the simulations easy to navigate, leading to improved satisfaction and engagement. However, the study also highlighted improvements in the delivery of the simulation is required to improve simulation learnability and efficiency.

About the authors

James Birt

James is an Assistant Professor at Bond University, where he runs the Mixed Reality Research Lab (www.mixedrealityresearch.com). His research spans computer science and visual arts, with an emphasis on applied design and development of interactive mixed reality (virtual reality, augmented reality, 3d printing, mobile) experiences assisting learning, skills acquisition and knowledge discovery. The distinctive contribution James brings to education scholarship is in digital media teaching and learning, where he received a 2014 Australian Office of Learning and Teaching citation for outstanding contributions to student learning. James utilises novel pedagogical approaches, curriculum and resources to balance the science and art predilections of his students, whilst supporting them with learning how to learn. His service to the university and wider community has formed around his experience in emerging technology, teaching and learning. Where he takes an active role in supporting learners and peers through mentorship, presentations and expert judging.

Patricia Manyuru

Patricia Manyuru is a Masters Student Bond University.

 


Me, Us and IT: Insiders' views of the complex technical, organisational and personal elements in using virtual worlds in education

Full paper 

Download the paper [PDF]

Sue Gregory
University of New England

Brent Gregory
University of New England

Denise Wood
Central Queensland University

Scott Grant
Monash University

Sasha Nikolic
University of Wollongong

Mathew Hillier
Monash University

Merle Hearns
Manukau Institute of Technology

Lisa Jacka
Southern Cross University

Marcus McDonald
RMIT University

Torsten Reiners
Curtin University

Sharon Lierse
Charles Darwin University

Blooma John
University of Canberra

Suku Sukunesan
Swinburne University of Technology

Emily Rutherford
University of Canberra

Jay Jay Jegathesan
University of Western Australia

Des Butler
Queensland University of Technology

Helen Farley
University of Southern Queensland

Pauletta Irwin
University of Newcastle

Catch this session

Monday 4 December, 11am - 11.30am
Stream 1
Room H102 Allison Dickson Lecture Theatre

Abstract

The adoption and pedagogical use of technologies such as virtual worlds to support teaching and learning, and research in higher education involves a complex interplay of technical, organisational and personal factors. In this paper, eighteen educators and researchers provide an overview of how they perceive a virtual world can be used in education from the perspective of themselves as individuals ‘me’, their educational organisations and as members of the Australian and New Zealand Virtual Worlds Working Group (VWWG) community of practice ‘us’, as well as the complex technology that underpins this learning environment ‘IT’. Drawing on Linstone’s (1981, 1984) Technical, Organisational and Personal (TOP) multiple perspective concept as the framework for analysis, the authors discuss their perspectives of how the personal, organisational and technical aspects of teaching through the use of virtual worlds have impacted on their teaching and research in higher education. The potential of employing the TOP framework to inform future research into the use of technologies such as virtual worlds in teaching and learning is explored.

About the authors

Sue Gregory

Associate Professor Sue Gregory is the Chair of Research, Education Scholar and member of the ICT team in the School of Education, University of New England, Armidale, Australia. She holds a Senior Fellowship of the Higher Education Academy. Sue teaches pre-service and postgraduate education students how to incorporate technology into their teaching. She has been applying her virtual world knowledge to expose her students, both online and off-campus, since 2007. She has been involved with many national and university projects on creating and using learning spaces in virtual worlds, with over Au$1.2m in grants, including five Australian Category 1, two as lead. She received an OLT citation in 2012. Since 2009, Sue has been Chair of the Australian and New Zealand Virtual Worlds Working Group and has over 100 publications on teaching and learning in virtual worlds and also in the area of exploring various tools for online teaching and learning.

Brent Gregory

Brent Gregory is a Chartered Accountant with extensive experience in Business Management and Growth. Prior to entering Academia his key area of research related to the attributes of successful business and in particular the key success factors for owner operated businesses. As a result he has devoted much of his professional career to guiding business on how to operate their businesses to better achieve their goals. He has also served on numerous regional development and community organisations.

Denise Wood

Denise Wood is a Professor, Engaged Research Chair and Director of the Centre for Regional Advancement of Learning, Equity, and Participation (LEAP) at Central Queensland University, Australia. She had led over AU$6 million in national funded research projects focusing on learning and teaching, and the innovative use of information and communication technologies, including virtual worlds, to enhance learning outcomes and the social and educational participation of people from underrepresented groups in Australia and South Africa. One of these projects, which is of particular interest to this publication, was an Australian Leaning and Teaching funded national project, “Facilitating flexible, enquiry-based experiential learning through an accessible, three-dimensional virtual learning environment (3DVLE)”, the outputs of which included guidelines for academics teaching in virtual worlds about the affordances and features virtual worlds for learning and teaching in higher education, case studies across a range of disciplinary fields and the development of an accessible virtual world viewer.

Scott Grant

Scott Grant has taught Chinese language and culture at tertiary level for more than 20 years. He coordinates and teaches Chinese Introductory 1 & 2 and Chinese Online Media 1 & 2. He is the creator of the Monash Chinese Island virtual language learning simulation in Second Life that has been part of the formal beginner level curriculum at Monash since 2008. Scott has also conducted collaborative research and jointly published a number of papers on educational uses of 3D multi-user virtual environments covering topics including self-efficacy, cognitive skills, second language acquisition and foreign language anxiety. In 2013/14, Scott was the Project Team Leader of the OLT funded Virtually Enhanced Languages (VEL) project which aims to share the experience and resources accumulated from implementing task-based language and culture learning on Chinese Island over a period of 10 years with other tertiary language educators.

Sasha Nikolic

Dr Sasha Nikolic is a lecturer at the University of Wollongong. From the University of Wollongong he received a B.E. degree in Telecommunications in 2001 and a PhD in Engineering Education in 2017. Sasha specialises in laboratory learning and video-augmented virtual environments. He won a university Outstanding Contribution to Teaching and Learning Award in 2011. In 2012, he was awarded a Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning as part of the OLT Australian Awards for University Teaching. In 2016 he was team leader for a project that won the ASCILITE Innovation Award. He is a senior member of IEEE and member of both AAEE and ASCILITE.

Mathew Hillier

Dr Mathew Hillier is a Senior Lecturer in the Office of Learning and Teaching at Monash University. Mathew specialises in e-assessment and e-exams and teaches into the academic staff development program at Monash University leading the 'technology and space' theme. He is one of two co-leaders of the ASCILITE SIG for 'e-Assessment' and in this capacity is a co-host of the Transforming Assessment webinar series along with Prof Geoffrey Crisp. He has previously taught into Business, Information systems, Engineering and Arts programs at several universities in Australia, Singapore and Hong Kong. Mathew is currently the leader of the 'Transforming Exams' project developing a toolset for authentic, computerised, high-stakes assessment (e-Exams). The project covers 10 university partners and is funded by a half-million dollar Australian government grant. He is also leading the development of a multi-language computerised exam platform for use in national professional translator accreditation. More about Mathew at http://ta.vu/mathewhillier

Merle Hearns

Merle Hearns is a Senior Lecturer in the Tertiary Teaching Unit at Manukau Institute of Technology. She previously worked in foundation (enabling education). Merle (then Lemon) was a Lead Educator for the 2009 Second Life Education in New Zealand (SLENZ Project), funded by the NZ Tertiary Education Commission Encouraging and Supporting Innovation Fund. Merle developed a literacy game, called The Mythical World of Hīnātore, which is available on a Kitely sim 24/7, as an Ako Aotearoa/MIT jointly funded research project. Merle is currently completing a PhD in education, focussing on the transference of skills learned in virtual worlds to the real world. Merle is involved in the Virtual Worlds Working Group (VWWG) which assists in facilitating collaborative research and informing best practices in the use of virtual worlds for teaching and learning. For more information, see https://www.linkedin.com/in/merle-hearns-b81a583/; https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Merle_Hearns; https://zc.academia.edu/MerleHearns; https://eportfolio.manukau.ac.nz/view/view.php?t=2Z8cCTmou1NRx5nwgPaG

Lisa Jacka

Dr Lisa Jacka is a lecturer in the School of Education at Southern Cross University, NSW. She has been an adult educator for many years who works with pre-service and post-graduate education students to expand their knowledge and confidence to integrate innovative ICTs into their teaching practice. Lisa has expertise in virtual worlds in education having completed PhD research in this field as she introduced educators to the possibilities of virtual worlds. She has over 27 publications including book chapters, journal articles and conference papers and in 2015 was awarded a Vice Chancellor's citation for innovative design and delivery online learning experiences that facilitate education students' readiness to teach in learning environments of the future.

Marcus McDonald

Dr Marcus McDonald is a Lecturer at RMIT University. He is focused on the affordances and application of educational technologies. Concerned mainly with how student experience may effect engagement and learner buy-in. Most recently he has been taking these evaluation methods in the evaluation of health care. This focus takes evaluations of learning engagement and examines the use and experience of Health Care practitioners with a range of third party payers and schemes. The intention is that it would influence the delivery and co-operation of these stake holders.

Torsten Reiners

Dr Torsten Reiners is Senior Lecturer in Logistics at the Curtin University, Australia. His research and teaching experiences are in the areas of operations research, but include instructional design, development of adaptive learning environments, distant collaboration, and mobile learning. His PhD thesis is about adaptive learning material in the field of operations research. He has participated in multiple projects to use 3D spaces for learning support; i.e., to improve the authenticity of learning in classes about production and simulation. He is project leader on a competitive grant from the Australian Office of Learning and Teaching (www.ndive-project.com).

Sharon Lierse

Dr Sharon Lierse is Lecturer in Education at Charles Darwin University (Melbourne). Prior to her appointment, she was Associate Professor in the Faculty of Music and Performing Arts in Malaysia where she was founder and Managing Editor of the Malaysian Music Journal. Dr Lierse has also lectured at the University of Tasmania, and was Manager of Professional Learning at ACER. She has published widely and has given conference presentations around the world including keynote presentations in Europe and Asia. Her research interests include instrumental music, lecturing face-to-face and online, and the characteristics of excellence in teaching in a university setting.

Blooma John

Blooma John is Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Business Government and Law, University of Canberra. She has a PhD in Information Systems from Nanyang Technological University. Her research interests are in text mining, social question answering, learning analytics and health informatics. She has published various academic articles including journal papers, book chapters and conference proceedings in these areas. She has won the award for Excellence in Learning and Teaching 2015 at RMIT Vietnam. She had also won the best paper of the conference award at the AIS Special Interest Group in Education 2013.

Suku Sukunesan

Dr Sukunesan is a Senior Lecturer at Swinburne University of Technology within the Information Systems Department, and is an Innovation Fellow within the Swinburne Innovation Precinct. He is an experienced researcher and academic with a keen interest in edutech applications, social media, social network analysis and disruptive technologies. He has previously used Twitter, Second Life and Shoutcast servers as part of his teaching innovation.

Emily Rutherford

Emily Rutherford is an Educational Designer at the University of Canberra. She works in partnership with the academic staff from the Faculty of Business, Governance and Law on staff development projects, teaching strategies and innovation, as well as University-wide learning and teaching projects. She enjoys connecting with new ways to use pedagogically-driven technology to support teaching strategies and enhance digital literacy skills. Emily has a strong background in teaching and supporting teaching practice, as well as being a passionate enthusiast of Second Life, VR/AR and mixed reality, and how they are explored creatively in a higher education context.

Jay Jay Jegathesan

Jay Jay Jegathesan holds a Bachelor of Commerce (Hons) degree from the University of Western Australia (UWA), majoring in management and marketing. An employee of UWA since 2004, Jay Jay is attached to the Graduate Research School coordinating an area looking after the interests of prospective PhD students in the medical field.

Des Butler

Des Butler is a Professor of Law at the Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology, where he served as Assistant Dean, Research (1997-2002). He was awarded his doctorate in 1996 for his thesis on liability for psychiatric injury, and is the author or co-author of 21 books and numerous articles on topics including legal education, media and entertainment law, psychiatric injury caused by negligence, and contract law. He is an Australian Learning and Teaching Fellow and a Senior Fellow of the United Kingdom Higher Education Academy. He has developed technology-based programs for enhancing the learning of law since 1990 and has received numerous awards for his work, many of which involve machinima created using the Second Life virtual world, including an Australian Award for Teaching Excellence, the LexisNexis/Australasian Law Teachers Association Award for Excellence and Innovation in the Teaching of Law (twice) and a Janders Dean/LexisNexis Legal Innovation Index Award.

Helen Farley

Dr Helen Farley is an Associate Professor (Digital Futures) at the Digital Life Lab, University of Southern Queensland. She researches the educational affordances of emerging digital technologies for learning. She is leading the Australian government-funded Making the Connection project which is introducing digital technologies into correctional centres to enhance access to higher education for Indigenous and non-Indigenous prisoners. The project has been successfully deployed in five states and territories with some 1000 students. Helen also led USQ’s Collaborative Research Network project to develop a Mobile Learning Evaluation Framework. Helen is also at the forefront of virtual world research, having led the award-winning Religion Bazaar project in Second Life. She has published extensively on the affordances of digital technologies to enhance learning and has secured around $6 million in funding. Twitter: @Helssi

Pauletta Irwin

Pauletta Irwin is a Nursing Lecturer and Simulated Learning Environment Coordinator at the School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle. Pauletta has a strong history in various simulation platforms in her years of employment in the tertiary sector. Pauletta’s doctoral research considers the nature of learning in a virtual world for undergraduate nursing students. She has led several innovative projects where virtual simulation has been piloted to teach nursing students skills such as holistic assessments, post graduate mental health students home environment assessments, and an international study examining a shared learning space with international students. Leadership on these projects has led to sustained partnerships with tertiary (national and international) and healthcare sectors. A committee member of the Faculty of Health and Medicine’s Centre of Excellence in Simulation, Pauletta is developing several interdisciplinary simulations that seek to improve student learning and capacity in the workforce.


Knowing when to target students with timely academic learning support: Not a minefield with data mining

Concise paper

Download the paper [PDF]

Elizabeth McCarthy
University of Southern Queensland
@elzbthmccrthy

Catch this session

Monday 4 December, 1.50pm - 2.10pm
Stream 4
Room L209

Abstract

The strategic scheduling of timely engagement opportunities with academic learning support, targeting specific student cohorts requires intentional, informed and coordinated planning. Currently these timing decisions appear to be made with a limited student focus, which considers individual course units only as opposed to having an awareness of the schedule constraints imposed by the students’ full course workload. Hence, in order to respect the full student academic workload, and maximise the quantity and quality of opportunities for students to engage with learning advisors, a means to capture and work with the composition and distribution of student full workload is needed. A data mining approach is proposed in this concise paper, where public domain information accessed from the back end HTML language of course unit information webpages is collected and consolidated in graphical form. The resulting visualisation of the students’ academic learning activities provides a quick and convenient means for academics to make informed scheduling decisions. The case study presented describes the implementation of the data mining in the context of discipline specific academic learning advisors at the University of Southern Queensland servicing three campuses under the ‘One-University’ model.

About the Author

Elizabeth McCarthy

Elizabeth McCarthy is a learning advisor, specialising in mathematics skills, and an academic in the mathematics and engineering disciplines with experience of 10 years. She is a mechatronics engineering, machine learning and mathematics enthusiast who is currently working towards her PhD project. For fun, she enjoys coding data science apps and tools to improve access to data for decision making purposes.


Me in a minute: A simple strategy for developing and showcasing personal employability

Concise paper

Download the paper [PDF]

Trina Jorre de St Jorre
Deakin University
@trinajorre

Liz Johnson
Deakin University

Gypsy O'Dea
Deakin University

Catch this session

Monday 4 December, 1.30pm - 1.50pm
Stream 5
Room C204

Abstract

Graduates require evidence of employability beyond marks and grades to differentiate themselves in the highly competitive labour market. Universities cannot guarantee employment, but they can engage students in learning and recognise achievement that is relevant to employment. Here, we share preliminary insights from interviews investigating student perceptions of an extra-curricular video strategy designed to develop and showcase graduate employability. The Me in a Minute video strategy provides students with support to film a one minute video pitch aimed at potential employers. Student perceptions of the strategy suggest that in addition to providing an individualised artefact that can be used to showcase achievement, the strategy engages students in reflection that helps them to better understand and articulate evidence of their achievements relevant to employment. Furthermore, students value the learning associated with pitching, more than the video itself.

About the authors

Trina Jorre de St Jorre

Dr Trina Jorre de St Jorre is a Lecturer in Graduate Employability at Deakin University. She is interested in pedagogies that engage and empower students and her research focus is on assuring graduate capabilities, improving employment outcomes and incorporating the student voice into curriculum development.

Liz Johnson

Liz Johnson is Pro Vice Chancellor, Teaching and Learning at Deakin University where she leads the Deakin Learning Futures, the central divisional team that supports learning and teaching. Liz is a National Teaching Fellow with research interests in work-integrated learning, curriculum renewal and building capability for learning and teaching. Liz is also Director of the Teaching and Learning Centre of the Australian Council of Deans of Science, leading a number of national projects to enhance university teaching in science.

Gypsy O'Dea

Gypsy O’Dea is a Psychology student, Writing Mentor, and Research Assistant at Deakin University. As a Writing Mentor, her focus is on strategies that empower students to become self-directed and independent learners, with a view to improving graduate outcomes. Her current research is with the Australian Temperament Project Generation 3 study, investigating intergenerational predictors of child development.