Personalised online professional learning on digital literacies for in-service teachers of English as a second language

Lightning talks 2

Trisha Poole
University of Southern Queensland
@_t2p_

Catch this session

Tuesday 5 December, 12pm - 12.30pm
Stream 3
Room L206

Abstract

This Lightening Talk presents an overview of a study that is focused on developing a framework for personalised online professional learning (POPL) on digital literacies for in-service teachers of English as a second language, and the associated development and implementation principles. Two key issues of digital literacies and digital literacies in language teacher education are addressed through developing POPL that is provided over an extended timeframe, is situated, is personalised, and is social. These four key features of the POPL are critical to its implementation and differentiation from other professional learning. In particular, the personalised aspect of the POPL is framed around the participant being provided with opportunities to personalise the content and their experience to their context and situation. That is, the participants can “choose their own adventure” through engaging with materials and selecting the learning path that aligns best with and facilitates their learning. The personalisation in the online space provides a new perspective on professional learning that tailors the experience to the learner-identified needs. Through these aspects of the POPL, it is expected that the professional learning will be effective in developing in-service ESL teachers’ own digital literacies and integrating digital literacies into their ESL curriculum.

About the authors

Trisha Poole

Trisha has worked in higher education for more than 15 years and throughout this time has focused on educational technologies and English as a second language. Her roles in higher education have included both academic and professional positions. Currently, Trisha is studying her PhD in education with the topic of “Personalised Online Professional Learning on Digital Literacies for In-service English as a Second Language Teachers”. Her PhD brings together her experience in ESL teaching and teacher training, and her passion for technology and digital literacies.


Mobile learning and speech technology for language teachers’ professional development: A design-based study

Concise paper

Download the paper [PDF]

Tran Le Nghi Tran
The University of Queensland

Catch this session

Tuesday 5 December, 11.40am - 12pm
Stream 1
Room H102

Abstract

This study aims to investigate the use of mobile learning to provide pronunciation training for English as a Foreign Language (EFL) lecturers from Vietnamese provincial universities. Mobile learning offers a potential solution for the delivery of professional development to lecturers based outside major cities thanks to its capacity to enable learning anytime, anywhere. Mobile learning and speech technology are expected to facilitate lecturers’ self-direct learning to fulfil their professional development needs using their own devices. This paper reports results from a pilot study which serves as the first phase of an on-going design-based research project. The pilot study was carried out to explore the feasibility of an online pronunciation course and identify potential problems for future course iterations in the context of participants living outside major cities in a developing country. The objectives of the project are to establish and test a set of fundamental principles for mobile learning to be an effective way of providing online professional development for lecturers based outside major cities and to shed light on the necessary adjustments in course design to make it a scalable model for future education planning. In this study, both qualitative and quantitative data were collected during two iterations of an online pronunciation professional development course for EFL lecturers from Vietnamese provincial universities.

About the Author

Tran Le Nghi Tran

Tran Le Nghi Tran is currently a PhD student at School of Education, The University of Queensland. She works as a casual lecturer, tutor and research assistant across different schools at The University of Queensland and Griffith University. Her research interests include educational technologies, English language teaching and learning and professional development.


Improving transnational and industry-supported student engagement through immersive videoconferencing in a 3D virtual environment

Innovation Award (2016)

Sasha Nikolic
University of Wollongong

Mark Lee
Charles Sturt University

Christian Ritz
University of Wollongong

Farzad Safaei
University of Wollongong

Tom Goldfinch
University of Wollongong

Wanqing Li
University of Wollongong

Catch this session

Tuesday 5 December, 12pm - 12.30pm
Stream 5
Room C204

Abstract

The aim of this project has been to use a novel immersive video collaboration technology to enhance the learning experience of transnational students, and to facilitate student interaction and engagement with their peers and with industry representatives. The goals are twofold: firstly, to afford offshore-enrolled students (those studying at overseas satellite campuses and partner institutions) equivalent learning experiences to locally enrolled students by emulating the essence of a single university campus environment, irrespective of their physical location; and secondly, to provide relevant and authentic learning opportunities for all students through real-time involvement of professionals and other subject-matter experts.

About the authors

Sasha Nikolic

Sasha Nikolic received the B.E. (telecommunications) in 2001 and PhD in Engineering Education in 2017 from the University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia. He spent several years in industry and then in 2006 commenced as Laboratory Manager, involved in improving and developing the teaching laboratories and sessional teaching staff with the University of Wollongong. In 2014, he became an Associate Lecturer in engineering education and in 2016 a Lecturer. Dr Nikolic became Chair of the NSW Chapter of the IEEE Education Society in 2014. He won a university Outstanding Contribution to Teaching and Learning Award in 2011. In 2012, he was awarded a Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning as part of the Australian Awards for University Teaching. In 2016, he also received awards for his contribution to engineering education through the IEEE, AAEE and ASCILITE.

Mark Lee

Christian Ritz

Farzad Safaei

Tom Goldfinch

Wanqing Li


The Student Relationship Engagement System: Empowering teachers to collect, analyse, and act on meaningful data to engage students at scale

Innovation Award (2016)

Danny Liu
The University of Sydney
@dannydotliu

Kevin Samnick
The University of Sydney
@kevin_samnick

Ruth Weeks
The University of Sydney
@ruthwsydney

Adam Bridgeman
The University of Sydney
@adambridgeman

Catch this session

Tuesday 5 December, 12pm - 12.30pm
Stream 1
Room H102

Abstract

The Student Relationship Engagement System (SRES) was developed at the University of Sydney to help academics personalise engagement with large student cohorts. Academics consistently report that positive feedback from students "shows how helpful the SRES is in allowing us to give the kind of personalised attention to students that time wouldn't otherwise allow". From marking attendance, analysing grades, collecting live feedback, and providing easy ways to personalise bulk feedback to students via emails and web portals, the SRES gives academics access to data that are meaningful in their contexts and helps them to create personalised learning environments with targeted feedback and support. This unique and inherently practical application of learning analytics is currently used across 20 departments in over 120 units and reaches over 20,000 students at the University of Sydney. It has been credited with increasing student engagement, improving retention rates, and enhancing students’ learning outcomes. The SRES is also being piloted at a number of other Australian universities, and we are keen for more collaborators. In this presentation, you will use the SRES live, hear about its implementation, wider adoption, and impact, and explore how it could impact students in your contexts.

About the authors

Danny Liu

Danny is a molecular biologist by training, programmer by night, researcher and academic developer by day, and educator at heart. A national teaching award winner, he focuses on wrangling technology to improve learning and teaching by working at the confluence of educational technology, student engagement, learning analytics, and professional development and leadership.

 

Kevin Samnick

Kevin is an Educational Designer with a background in secondary STEM teaching, pharmaceutical research, and biology. He is an advocate for education, learning, technology, and ensuring students and teachers are our first priority in higher education.

Ruth Weeks

Ruth is an Educational Design Manager with a background in teaching English as a foreign language and academic writing. She is passionate about teaching with technology and the future of digital education.

Adam Bridgeman

Adam is Director of Educational Innovation at the University of Sydney and has received institutional and national awards for teaching and is an Australian National Teaching Fellow. He aims to invigorate and change learning and teaching culture through a focus on blended, collaborative, and interactive learning designs.


Debating the use of social media in higher education

Lightning talks 2

Julie Willems
RMIT University
@Julie_Willems

Chie Adachi
Deakin University
@ChieAdachi

Francesca Bussey
Deakin University
@fbussey1

Iain Doherty
Deakin University

Henk Huijser
Queensland University of Technology
@hhuijser

Catch this session

Tuesday 5 December, 12pm - 12.30pm
Stream 3
Room L206

Abstract

To an international audience on 28 November 2016, and as part of the presentations at ASCILITE 2016, a ‘great debate’ on the use of social media in higher education was conducted by a team of researchers. As part of the debate, there was an opportunity to tap into the collective wisdom of our attending experienced colleagues. Approximately 150 conference delegates attended the hour-long session in order to engage with both sides of the argument. The research team carefully crafted the arguments to ensure that the debate covered key areas of interest and concern found in the literature of teaching and learning, as well as concerns within the higher education sector as a whole. The aim was to prompt the audience to participate and contribute to a discussion reflective of multiple perspectives, albeit within a specialist group cohort. Using a roving microphone to draw contributions from the floor, as captured via the live video streaming tool Periscope, and in addition to comments captured in the live debate Twitter feed from both the audience participants and beyond, rich data was captured. As both sources of data are available in the public domain, research ethics exemption was granted. While the findings of this research will be compiled for a journal publication for further exploration, this presentation summarises the findings and expands on some key ideas that emerged from the debate and broader collegial input. These findings will form the basis for further exploration.

About the authors

Julie Willems

Dr Julie Willems holds qualifications in education, the humanities, and nursing. Her research interests include media and technology in formal and informal learning, along with educational and digital equity as social justice issue. She is a Senior Lecturer in RMIT’s central unit, the Learning & Teaching Academy. Julie was a of the auDA Foundation's national 2011 research grant for the i-Survive Project investigating the use of ‘back channel’ communications via mobile technologies and social media during Australian emergencies and disasters. Julie has a community focus and has served on a number of committees and boards relating to educational technology and social justice in education over the course of her career. She served on the national Executive of ODLAA from 2011 to 2014, and is currently in her second term on the ASCILITE national Executive. Julie is an active member of the ASCILITE 2018 conference to be hosted by Deakin University.

Chie Adachi

Dr Chie Adachi is a Lecturer within the central learning and teaching unit at Deakin University, Melbourne. She holds a PhD in Sociolinguistics and Masters and Bachelor degrees in Education (TESOL). Combined with her teaching and research experiences in the Higher Education sector for over 10 years across Japan, UK and Australia, she enjoys daily thinking about and researching within the area of digital learning, peer learning and intercultural communication.

Francesca Bussey

Dr Francesca Bussey is an academic at Deakin University working with Learning Futures, and the Faculty of Arts and Education, to lead and support innovation and capacity building in all areas of teaching and learning in higher education. Working with a small dedicated team, she specialises in curriculum development, online learning, MOOC delivery, quality assessment strategies, and the use of targeted digital technology to support learning and teaching. Francesca also teaches out of the School of Education, chairing a unit in the History and Philosophy of Education. With over 20 years’ experience working in higher education, Francesca has developed knowledge and skills in policy and planning, project implementation, outreach and student equity, academic skills delivery, building digital identities, teaching and learning, and online delivery. Francesca’s principal research interests are in the History and Philosophy of Technology and Education. Her research is informed by her academic background as an historian and her professional experience as a social equity practitioner. Special interests include social justice, feminist theory and philosophy for children.

Iain Doherty

Dr Iain Doherty heads up a team of academic, resource development and production specialists (the Pod) who work with the Faculty of Arts and Education to ensure effective course enhancement using Deakin’s Curriculum Framework. As a teaching and learning professional, Iain has a career history that has seen him develop knowledge and skills in inclusive leadership practices; strategic and operational planning; project management; and change management. Iain's collaborative approach to facilitating change in teaching and learning is grounded in a sound knowledge of: teaching and learning theories; curriculum and course design principles; purposeful use of technologies to enhance teaching and learning; and creating effective professional development opportunities for teachers. Iain has been research active throughout his career with a publication list that reflects his areas of career expertise along with his appreciation of collaborative research.

Henk Huijser

Dr Henk Huijser has been a Curriculum Designer in the Learning and Teaching Unit at Queensland University of Technology since September this year. Henk has a background and a PhD in screen and media studies, but has worked as an educational developer in Australia, the Arabian Gulf, and China since 2005. He has published widely in both the areas of learning and teaching in higher education, and media and cultural studies. For more information please visit: http://henkhuijser.webs.com/


Me, us and IT: Developing approaches and support strategies for changing learning spaces

Lightning talks 2

Meredith Hinze
The University of Melbourne
@mmhinze

Catch this session

Tuesday 5 December, 12pm - 12.30pm
Stream 3
Room L206

Abstract

The design of learning spaces is changing from the traditional lecture theatre style of academia. At the same time, some disciplines in Higher Education are seeing a shift in curriculum towards seminar-style teaching, with an intentional focus on active learning strategies to enhance teaching and learning. The redesign of learning spaces provides affordability for remodelling subjects. This presentation provides insight into professional development approaches and support strategies developed for staff to meet these challenges. It explores some of the eTeaching and eLearning support strategies to help teaching staff remodel their subjects for more active, seminar-styled approaches for teaching in the humanities and social science disciplines, in the redesigned learning spaces of the new Arts West building at The University of Melbourne.

About the authors

Meredith Hinze

Meredith is Manager of eLearning/eTeaching in the Faculty of Arts, at the University of Melbourne, and manages a small team that supports teaching staff integrate technology in teaching and learning. Meredith has a strong background in teaching digital media and ICT in the humanities and social sciences at both undergraduate and graduate levels, in the Faculty of Arts at the University of Melbourne. She also has over 20 years experience in providing ICT support and professional development training for academic staff, and over 15 years experience in IT & Web management, managing both large and complex websites as well as small project sites. She has special interests in social media and digital communications and their application in teaching and learning.


Technology-enhanced learning collaboratives: A faculty development initiative for the science, medicine, and health disciplines

Lightning talks 2

David Bruce Porter
University of Wollongong
@dbp1975

Helen Jamieson
University of Wollongong

Adrian Moody
University of Wollongong

Catch this session

Tuesday 5 December, 12pm - 12.30pm
Stream 3
Room L206

Abstract

The University of Wollongong Faculty of Science, Medicine, and Health is interested in the strategic integration of technology. Using Wenger and Lave’s Communities of Practice as the foundation, SMAH has launched the Technology-Enhanced Learning Collaboratives (TELCs). Each of the four TELCs takes an academic-centred, blended learning approach to addressing topics in technology-enhanced learning and teaching. Evaluation of the TELCs will employ measures of academic engagement, academic surveys, and individual community outcomes. This presentation provides an overview of the TELCs and a status report of their progress.

About the authors

David Bruce Porter

Dr David Bruce Porter is Manager: Educational Technology in the University of Wollongong Faculty of Science, Medicine, & Health. David leads of team of technology-enhanced learning specialists to support and empower academics to use technology to innovate and transform student learning. David’s interests include educational technology leadership, academic support and development, and educational design.

Helen Jamieson

Mrs. Helen Jameson is the Educational Developer in the University of Wollongong Faculty of Science, Medicine & Health Educational Technology Team. Helen has a diverse background, including applied experience in the primary and tertiary education sectors. Prior to joining the team, Helen taught Web Design and Computer Support for TAFE Illawarra. Helen’s interests include Web, graphics, and multimedia design and Moodle and game development.

Adrian Moody

Mr Adrian Moody is the in the University of Wollongong Faculty of Science, Medicine & Health Educational Technology Team. In addition to 10 years as an instructor of Business Administration and Information Technology, Adrian’s diverse experience includes extensive time in both the complementary health and the entertainment sectors. Prior to joining UOW, Adrian worked in Digital Learning Services for TAFE Online where he wrote, created, and uploaded content.


2017 Year of Open: Is it worth celebrating in Australia?

Open fishbowl

Tamara Heck
University of Southern Queensland
@tamaraheck

Neil Martin
University of Southern Queensland

Adrian Stagg
University of Southern Queensland
@OpenKuroko

Catherine Wattiaux
University of Southern Queensland

Amelia Dowe
University of Southern Queensland

Catch this session

Tuesday 5 December, 3.45pm - 4.45pm
Stream 3
Room L206

In this session, the facilitators will be using sli.do. The event code is: OEP17

Abstract

Whilst 2017 is internationally celebrated as the Year of Open, the fishbowl discussion aims at critically discuss the current state of the art of openness in higher education. We concede that open educational practice, including for example the use, creation and sharing of open educational resources, is neither widely understood, nor widely engaged within Australia. Reasons are that research is mostly focusing on open educational resources, not on overall practices. The latter includes investigations in practical issues applying open practices. As holistic solutions have yet to mature - regarding for example staff development, organisational policy and commitment, as well as business models - the community is still reluctant in engaging in open practices.

Our core questions we want to discuss with the audience are:

  1. What does an Australian higher education sector that embraces OEP look like? and
  2. What are the key factors that act as barriers to widespread adoption of open educational practices in Australia?

We refer to five major barriers that we think hinder and partly lock off the success of openness in higher education, which are lack of recognition in policies, value proposition, institutional prestige, competitiveness as well as guidelines. The open fishbowl concept aims at discussing those barriers together with the audience, but as well allows participants to come up with their own opinions and perceptions about current openness processes and developments.

About the authors

Tamara Heck

Tamara Heck is a research fellow working in the Digital Life Lab at the University of Southern Queensland. She is currently researching openness in science and education. One of her recent studies conducted with an inter-disciplinary team involved a survey on open science in higher education and asked over 200 participants on their open teaching and learning practices as well as on their usage of open collaborative tools. Further research investigates in questions on how researchers and academics perceive open practices in their work, how openness impacts research outputs and how it influences research impacts.

Neil Martin

Neil Martin is the Senior Digital Innovator in the Digital Life Lab at the University of Southern Queensland. His doctoral thesis based in psychology, examined the optimal design of open online courses using motivational principles articulated in self-determination theory. He has nearly 20 years of experience working in higher education in Australia and the UK and has held roles as a web developer, web services manager, and learning technologist. His current research interests examine how digital technology can support wellbeing and flourishing from a positive psychology perspective.

Adrian Stagg

Adrian Stagg is currently the Manager (Open Educational Practice) for the University of Southern Queensland. His career has included over 14 years in both public and academic libraries, as well as positions as a Learning Technologist and eLearning Designer. Adrian holds a Master of Applied Science (Library and Information Management). His interest in Open Educational Practice has prompted the commencement of a PhD at the University of Tasmania focusing on the practitioner experience in the reuse of Open Educational Resources. His research areas include the ecology of open educational practice and higher education policy as it relates to and supports, open educational initiatives.

Catherine Wattiaux

Catherine Wattiaux is the Manager of the Library copyright services at the University of Southern Queensland. She has 17 years in academic and scholarly libraries and R&D services. Since her initial thesis on Selective Dissemination of Information, she has developed an interest in knowledge management, data management, and open access datasets. Her work in copyright has led her to increase her knowledge in Open Educational Resources and current scholarly publishing practices. Her research area is in the identification and use of Open Educational Resources for higher education as well as the data management of above mentioned resources.

Amelia Dowe

Amelia Dowe is the Learning Advisor for Engineering, Built Environment and IT disciplines at USQ. She is currently involved in an Open Educational Practice grant to develop an online program to support students on the Autism Spectrum as they transition to University. With an academic background in Applied Linguistics and Disability, her research interests focus on equity and diversity in Higher Education.


Online professional learning: Lessons, challenges, opportunities

Open fishbowl

Jonathan Powles
University of New England
@jonpowles

Shelley Kinash
University of Southern Queensland
@KinashinAUs

Aliya Steed
University of New England
@afsteed

Jennifer Lawrence
University of Canberra
@jennyalawrence

Catch this session

Tuesday 5 December, 12pm - 12.30pm
Stream 2
Room R113

Abstract

Often, our default pedagogies for professional, authentic, and/or work-integrated learning start with face-to-face assumptions. The “placement” is the starting-point for many academics’ thinking about how to provide students with authentic experience of professional work, and the placement is predicated on the assumption of physical presence in the workplace. Often, academics’ experience of other pedagogical strategies for authentic learning – for instance, problem-based learning, role play, action research – start with an assumption of physical presence.
On the other hand, we now have many rich experiences of professional, work-integrated and authentic learning that have been situated online. This fishbowl session allows participants to share, analyse and learn from these experiences. What are the challenges and opportunities in moving role play or simulation online? What have MOOCs taught us about how people seek to develop their professional education? What technologies and tools exist to capture authentic learning in the workplace and curate these as online records of professional practice? How do employers respond or react to professional learning conducted online? What sorts of pedagogical and business models have universities adopted around online professional qualifications, and how do these differ from more traditional models? Given that the great majority of students who study online are simultaneously working, how have we or can we leverage this body of existing professional experience as part of students’ learning journeys?

About the authors

Jonathan Powles

Jonathan Powles’ role at UNE is to lead the strategic pedagogical direction of the university. With 18,000 online students, UNE is Australia’s oldest provider of distance and online education, with a rich history of delivering online, professionally-focused education in fields as diverse as agriculture, education, healthcare, business, law and the performing arts. Prior to taking up his position at UNE Jonathan held education leadership positions at a variety of universities in Australia and the UK, where he led and contributed to a number of online and professional-education curriculum innovations.

Shelley Kinash

Shelley Kinash returned to USQ as Director, Advancement of Teaching and Learning in 2017. Previously she was Director of Teaching and Learning at Bond University, where her major achievements were championing employability throughout the everyday curriculum; migrating the student evaluation of teaching to an online system; and supporting a whole-of-university approach to blended / technology-enhanced learning. She has over 200 publications including 3 books. The central tenets of Shelley’s research portfolio are student voice, learning experience and employability and academic development. Shelley has a long history of research and practice in employability. She has co-led two national strategic priority research projects (Supporting graduate employability from generalist disciplines through employer and private institution collaboration; and Engaging postgraduate students and supporting higher education to enhance the 21st century student experience).

Aliya Steed

Aliya Steed has led and contributed to the development of online professional learning programs at ANU for nearly twenty years. For much of that time she managed the educational design programs at the ANU College of Law, where she led the development of pedagogical strategies and technological environments for a national program in Migration Law and Practice; a fully-online and Australia-wide simulation-based Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice; and most recently an online, PBL-based Juris Doctor program. As Manager, educational design at ANU Online, she and her team support online innovation ANU-wide, including programs ranging through business, science, languages and health, and the development of ANU’s suite of MOOCs. In October 2017 she joined the University of New England as Manager, Strategic Learning Initiatives.

Jennifer Lawrence

As Teaching and Learning Fellow (transition pedagogy) at UC, Jennifer Lawrence has led the development and delivery of “Foundations of Professional Planning”, a first-year unit taken by nearly all undergraduate students. This unit supports students to identify their potential professional destinations, and develop a five-year plan to acquire the specific and generic skills required to reach that destination through a combination of curricular and co-curricular learning. The unit is delivered both face-to-face and online. Jennifer also led the development and delivery of UC’s related MOOC, “Navigating Your Professional Future”. Prior to joining UC, Jennifer taught in the secondary sector, where her foci included authentic learning and learning technology innovation.


The effect of digital game-based language learning mobile application on the development of complexity, accuracy, and fluency in foreign language monologic oral production among Chinese Learners of English as a Foreign Language

Concise paper

Download the paper [PDF]

Feifei Han
The University of Sydney

Zehua Wang
Shaanxi Xueqian Normal University

Catch this session

Tuesday 5 December, 11am - 11.20am
Stream 1
Room H102

Abstract

The study reports the effect of a digital game-based language learning (DGBLL) mobile application “Speaking English Fluently – An Automated Scoring Artificial Intelligent Tutoring System on Spoken English” on the complexity, accuracy, and fluency in foreign language (FL) monologic oral production among 31 second year Chinese university learners of English as a foreign language (EFL). The participants’ monological oral production was measured in the first (week 1) and last (week 21) weeks of a semester using the same narrative picture description task. The oral production was audio-recorded and transcribed. Both the transcripts and audio-files were analyzed on the complexity, accuracy, and fluency dimensions. The complexity was measured using the number of Mean (M) words per T-unit, the accuracy dimension was measured using the number of repairs and errors per 100 words; and the fluency dimension was measured via speech rate (i.e., number of words per minute), and M length of pauses. Students were required to download the mobile application and followed the monological practice section twice a week for 30 minutes each time. Using paired sample t-tests, we found that even though the participants’ repair rate and speech rate remained unchanged, they produced more complex monological speech, had significantly fewer errors, and reduced average length of pauses after 20 weeks treatment using the mobile application, demonstrating a positive effect of the DGBLL mobile application on FL learners’ monological oral production.

About the authors

Feifei Han

Feifei Han currently is an educational researcher at the University of Sydney. Her current research interests comprise of three broad themes: (1) language and literacy education; (2) teaching, learning, and educational technology in higher education, and (3) educational psychology.

Zehua Wang

Zehua Wang obtained a Bachelor of Arts (2010) from Xi’an International Studies University, and a Master of Education (2013) from the University of Sydney. Currently she is a Lecturer in the Department of English at Shaanxi Xueqian Normal University, Xi’an, China. Her current research interests are (1) language learning strategies and (2) educational technology in higher education. Ms. Wang has received funding on four research projects in China and she has published a number of journal articles.